Friday, March 13th, 2015

Cover for Drabblecast 53, Sing, by Rick GreenChild, you sing all the time- when you’re walking, when you’re eating, even when you’re laughing.  You people make the most beautiful music in the entire galaxy…

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Originally published in Aboriginal SF, February 1987.
Episode Art:  Richard K. Green

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Thursday, February 12th, 2015
Warning:  Really Sad

Cover for Drabblecast episode 93, Blue, by Richard K. GreenI had a dog, his name was Blue
Betchya five dollars he’s a good one too.
Come on Blue!
I’m a-comin’ too.

Glum weather in Baltimore inspires Norm to treat us all to a pair of melancholy stories. In Shane Shennen’s Drabble, “Ancient Apple Tree,” the passing of an old, faithful robot is mourned by nary an organic eye. Next, accomplished writer Mike Resnick (who appears in Drabblecast #67, “Malish,” and #102 “The Last Dog”) bases a sad tale of attrition and mourning on the traditional song “Old Blue.” Accompanied by Norm’s gentle rendition of the song, the story describes the mutual loyalty of a hermit and his canine companion in a harsh season. A grateful Norm confesses to his love of dogs after the song and story conclude. This is followed by feedback for Episodes #88 (“The Toys of Peace”) and #89 (“Starry Night”), which is generally positive.

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Originally published in Hunting Dog magazine, 1979.
Heaven's Bones by Samantha Henderson
Episode Art:  Richard K. Green

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Thursday, May 15th, 2014

Cover for Drabblecast B-sides 46, The Hodag, by Richard K. GreenI still remember that cold October afternoon in 1936 when Whitey McFarland’s old coonhound Maggie dragged herself out of the forest, whimpering and yowling. Her skin hung off her sides in red flaps and her eyes rolled wildly. She collapsed on the ground and howled.

All us kids loved Maggie, but not one of us dared go near her, not while she was baring her teeth and snarling. Benny Carper dropped the bat and ran off; Ira Schmidt just stood there staring at the half-dead animal as it pawed the frozen dirt. I tugged on Whitey’s sleeve and told him to stay with Maggie while I got my dad—Whitey’s dad was a drunk and never easy to find. When he finally nodded in understanding, I took off running.

First appeared in Black Static 7, October 2008.
Episode Art:  Richard K. Green

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Sunday, May 4th, 2014

Cover for Drabblecast episode 323, Missed Connection, by Richard K. GreenLawson was already regretting the decision to go shopping by the time he was standing in line waiting to buy a ticket for the tube. All but one of the time- and labour-saving automatic ticket dispensers was either closed or unable to give change, and it was all he could do not to let out yelps of irritated despair at the inability of those in front of him to understand the process of getting the machine to yield up its wares. The station seemed to be unusually full of squalling children and jabbering mad people, and the flu which he’d thought in decline was thriving in the damp mildness of the winter afternoon. All in all he was beginning to feel like death cooled down, and he was barely on step one of the afternoon.

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First appeared in The End of the Line anthology, 2011.
Episode Art:  Richard K. Green
Read by:  Dan Chambers

Twabble:  “At the end of the date they looked at her photos. “This is my favorite” she said. It was him, years ago. They were all of him. ”  by  inkhat

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Thursday, October 3rd, 2013

Cover for Drabblecast episode 298, Flying On Hatred of My Neighbor's Dog, by Richard K. GreenI know my neighbor’s dog as a bark: a deep, dark, venomous yawp that begins and ends on a snarl. It’s loud, louder than it should be. Earplugs do nothing. It penetrates. Once it starts, it continues, relentlessly, for a period ranging from one to four hours. It can start at any time, day or night, dropping from the veils of morning to where the cricket sings.

 

 

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A Drabblecast original.
Episode Art:  Richard K. Green
Read by:  Nathan Lee

Twabble:  “The demon was fed up with an eternity of unpaid torturing. Calling a strike, he shambled off to see if he could raise hell. ”  by  Cymraeg

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Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013

Cover for Drabblecast episode 270, The First Conquest of Earth, by Richard K. GreenWhen the alien fleet was first sighted just beyond the asteroid belt, end-of-the-world riots broke out in cities around the globe. But when astronomers calculated that the huge, silent ships would take nearly three weeks to reach Earth, all but the most committed rioters felt their enthusiasm wilt. By the end of the day they’d all dropped their bricks or bats and slunk home, plundered consumer electronics in hand, muttering about the aliens’ apparent lack of urgency...

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Originally published in Analog Science Fiction and Fact, Jan/Feb 2011. Episode Sponsor -- Post Apocalyptic Audio Drama The Cleansed
Episode Art:  Richard K. Green
Read by:  Dave Dedionisio of Those Who Dig

Twabble:  “The walrus ate no fruit. Plus he & half the garden warned of the dangers. But, three bad apples ruined Eden for everybody. ”  by  Algernon Sydney is Dead

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Thursday, May 17th, 2012

Cover for Drabblecast episode 243, The Other Lila, by Richard K. GreenI step out of a porter booth in the overheated Los Angeles station and reach up to peel off my winter coat. That’s when I realize something’s wrong with my hand — it feels numb and prickly, and the fingers aren’t quite responding the way they’re supposed to. Weird. I don’t recall circulatory problems being listed among the possible side effects…

This episode of The Drabblecast explores the meaning of identity. In the drabble, two friends swap bodies after being struck by lightning, but is anyone paying attention? In the feature, having an extra finger after a teleporter accident turns out to be the least of Lila’s worries; she now must contend with an entirely additional Lila.

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Originally published in Bull Spec (Summer 2010).
Episode Art:  Richard K. Green
Read by:  Naomi Mercer

Twabble:  “"1000 bucks to hunt zombies in your park? Where'd you get them?" "We started with 22. The rest were like you. Customers." ”  by  MattMooreWrites

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