Friday, April 13th, 2012

Cover for Drabblecast episode 239, Killing the Morrow, by John DeBergeYou know, I’ve heard my share of disembodied voices.  I’m accustomed to their fickle, sometimes bizarre demands.  But tonight’s voice is different, clear as gin and utterly compelling.  I must listen…

This episode of the Drabblecast concerns time and inter-dimensional travel. In the drabble, a being hurriedly fleeing its own dimension accidentally merges with a pizza jockey but still cannot escape its pursuers. In the feature, Killing the Morrow, voices from a ruined future attempt to flee to our present, commandeering a workforce to construct bathtub chambers where they can grow physical bodies and ready cities from which to rule. Is this the end of mankind as we know it, or can a second faction of future-dwellers subvert this implosive invasion?

Originally published in: Starlight Anthology #1, 1996.
Episode Art:  John Deberge

Twabble:  “"Heard you got pulled over by the thought police the other night." "Yeah I was thinking a mile a minute - in a school zone!" ”  by  loyaleagle

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  •  Feature:  From the Lost Diary of TreeFrog7  by  Nnedi Okorafor
  •  Drabble:  Moving the Goalposts  by  Nathan Lee
  •  Genre:  Drabblecast  Sci-Fi

Thursday, March 29th, 2012

Cover for Drabblecast episode 238, The Lost Diary of TreeFrog7, by Caroline ParkinsonTranslating… Appendix 820 of The Forbidden Greeny Jungle Field Guide. This series of audio files was created by TreeFrog7. It has been automatically translated into text

In this episode of the Drabblecast, heavily pregnant jungle explorer TreeFrog7 keeps a recorded diary of data she and her husband are collecting for the Forbidden Greeny Jungle Field Guide. As they close in on a legendary mature CPU plant (MCPU), a wild version of cultivated CPU plants used as personal computers, they encounter numerous jungle creatures including an enormous flightless moth protecting the plant. Despite its attacks, the explorers do not want to kill the moth in case the MCPU needs it to survive. While treed by the moth in the MCPU, TreeFrog7 gives birth to their daughter while her husband downloads the MCPU’s data. Close enough to see the MCPU’s monitor, they watch a rapidly shifting display of locations and symbols. TreeFrog7 realizes the images are getting closer to their own location and represent another explorer’s collected data. Finally, the scene fades and the monitor shows only two eyes. The diary ends with an entry by an unknown voice that implies the explorers have themselves been collected. In the drabble, a teenage boy fails to convince an uninterested, gum-snapping girl that he understands her feelings of otherness and isolation.

Originally published in Clarkesworld Magazine.
Episode Art:  Caroline Parkinson
Read by:  Veronica Giguere

Twabble:  “Her whiskers tickled my cheek as she purred and explored my face. Who would have thought grandma was this affectionate? ”  by  TroyStJames

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Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

Cover for Drabblecast episode 229, Singularity Knocks, by Forrest Warner“You don’t have to talk like that to us, mister,” I said. “We know town-speak just fine.”

The man with the hat put it back on his head and smiled with a hint of embarrassment. “Sorry, folks. Sometimes it helps, you know, smooth the way.”

That man with the computer was lurking by the corner of our porch, holding it up and aiming some kind of camera at the eaves. He steered a pair of laser beams from one end to the other. I figured I’d let him do what he was doing if I didn’t see any harm.

“Smooth the way for what?” I asked. I knew what was coming next, what was always coming: talk of imminent domain, of making way for progress.

“Something exciting,” he said, lifting up a foot onto the lowest step. “Opportunity of a lifetime…”

This episode of the Drabblecast explores science of the future. In the drabble, a lab rat learns to speak but still cannot talk the scientists studying him out of his eventual dissection despite their similarities. In the feature, government agents try to convince a family of aging farmers to join the rest of humanity by being uploaded into the singularity, a virtual world where everyone can lead any life they can dream up. No one can be left behind..

A Drabblecast original story.
Episode Art:  Forrest Warner
Music by:   The Avett Brothers

Twabble:  “David wished people would stop staring. After 500 years, he still wouldn't forgive Michel for not chiseling him a robe. ”  by  DutchessAlyssa

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Monday, November 7th, 2011

Cover for Drabblecast episode 222, Rules for Living in a Simulation, by Mike DominicNow if we, like those characters in recent movies, discovered specific clues in the world around us suggesting that we do in fact live in a simulation, we would of course consider those clues carefully to see what they say about how we should live our lives. — Robin Hanson

Norm begins this episode of the Drabblecast with an introduction to the new and improved, and thanks the many contributors who made this possible. The Drabble by John Murphy remembers a simpler time in video games, though a time not free of consequence. The feature by Aubrey Hirsch provides, as described in the title, a didactic set of rules for living in a simulation (a universe constructed especially for us).

Episode Sponsor: You Shall Never Know Security by J.R. Hamantaschen.

Originally published in Daily Science Fiction. (September 2011) Geologic Podcast, Big Wonderful Press, Daily SF
Episode Art:  Mike Dominic
Read by:  George Hrab

Twabble:  “Bo waded through the mangled body parts and scattered office supplies to his cubicle. He really hated Casualty Friday. ”  by  Steven D. Lidster

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Wednesday, October 26th, 2011
Warning:  An S*Bomb. Also, sexual content. The S*Bomb was way worse though.

Cover for Drabblecast episode 220, Trifecta XVIII, by Liz PenniesAnother of the Drabblecast’s vaunted Trifecta series. Three short stories, each with a unique twist. The episode begins with an interview of author J.R. Hamantaschen, Norm runs fingers through his troubled mind, learning of the seeds from which his horrors spring. The theme of this Trifecta: getting the boot – stories of rejection and alienation. First up, Richard Weems’s Bad Habit, in which a nun and a naked pervert do battle (no, really). Next, author Andrew Gudgel (featured on fellow podcasts such as Escapepod) appears with Tags, as read by Kimi Alexander, a story of teenage dares in a technologically submerged world. Lastly, A Happy Family, by author, novelist Nathaniel Tower, read by Abner Senires, in which a family receives a very unexpected bundle of joy (and puzzlement).

Episode Sponsor: You Shall Never Know Security by J.R. Hamantaschen.

"Bad Habit" by Richard Weems is a Drabblecast original story. "Tags" by Andrew Gudgel was originally published by Flash Fiction Online, September 2010. "A Happy Family" by Nathaniel Tower was originally published by Bourbon Penn (Jan 2011).
Episode Art:  Liz Pennies
Read by:  Kimi Alexander and Abner Senires
Music by:   Gringo Motel

Twabble:  ““We don’t allow no faster-than-light neutrinos in here,” says the bartender, with a growl. A neutrino walks into a bar. ”  by  Strawman

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Monday, May 9th, 2011

Cover for Drabblecast episode 204, DoubleHeader 8, Kelly MartinezHere is the first joke of Betty L. Duncan. Why do the three-eyed aliens bank on the moon? Because there is not enough sun to go around. Press the blue button when you have finished laughing…

"A Day Out" was originally published in Birkensnake #1, July 2008. "Hard Choices" was originally published in Brain Harvest, 7 June 2009.
Episode Art:  K. Martinez

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Sunday, December 5th, 2010

Cover for Drabblecast episode 190, The Wheel, by Josh Hugo“I’ll tell you what’s going to happen tomorrow, Davie. In the orning the priest will come here to see your box. It’ll be still there because nobody dares to touch it…”

This episode of Drabblecast deals with fear and rationality. The feature takes us to a world where fear of knowledge and how it can be used for evil prevents humanity from progressing.

Originally published in Jizzle (1952). Frank Key's "Impugned by a Peasant Other Stories" {sponsor}
Episode Art:  Josh Hugo

Twabble:  “She chomped grimly on a neon chicklet stick figure. Voodoo Chew was the cheapest nico-gum, but why was her son screaming? ”  by  Petricore

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